2014 Draft: Nationals draft C Jakson Reetz No. 93

After taking two pitchers in the opening two rounds of the 2014 First-Year Player Draft on Thursday night -- right-hander Erick Fedde and left-hander Andrew Suarez -- the Nationals selected their first position player in the third round on Friday.

With the No. 93 overall pick, Washington drafted catcher Jakson Reetz out of Norris High School in Hickman, Neb. The 6-foot-1, 195-pound University of Nebraska commit burst onto the scene last August when he was named MVP of the Perfect Game All-American Classic. He went 2-for-4 with an RBI and two stolen bases.

The Draft concludes on Saturday with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at 1 p.m. ET.

"Very excited," vice president of scouting operations Kris Kline said. "This is a high school catcher that we love."

2014 Draft Central

Reetz is considered a quality two-way player who has a strong arm behind the plate and can reach low 90s on the mound, but Kline said the Nationals are more interested in Reetz's power bat. Baseball America ranked Reetz as the No. 62 overall prospect and the top prospect in Nebraska entering the Draft.

"He's got a really good feel to hit," Kline said. "You're looking at an offensive catcher at the big league level down the road."

Kline compared Reetz's defense to that of Athletics catcher Derek Norris.

"We feel that we have the right people to help him progress in that area," Kline said.

Reetz is the only high school player the Nationals drafted in the first 10 rounds of the Draft. And while Kline said that wasn't by design, there is a certain level of maturity he necessitates from high school players before drafting them.

"The high school kid in our mind has to profile as a college guy, and I mean that physically and mentally," Kline said. "Is he capable of going out there and playing and handling it every day? Those are things that we look for, and those are high school players that we focus on. If they don't fit that criteria, we're going to take a college player."

JUCO pitcher Dickey selected by Nats

Draft Report: Robbie Dickey, Junior College Pitcher

The Nationals drafted right-hander Erick Fedde with the No. 18 pick in the first round of the First-Year Player Draft on Thursday night, and they added another right-handed pitcher in the fourth round on Friday.

With the No. 124 overall pick, Washington selected Robbie Dickey out of Blinn College in Brenham, Texas. Dickey is committed to Texas State, but he will likely forgo that opportunity to play professionally.

The Draft concludes on Saturday with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at 1 p.m. ET.

"We're going to get that done," vice president of scouting operations Kris Kline said of drafting Dickey. "The kid's very excited."

The 6-foot-3 right-hander touches 97 mph on his fastball, and he also throws a slider and changeup. Dickey was perhaps the top JUCO prospect after the fall, but he struggled with biceps tendinitis in the spring. The 20-year-old still posted a 2.74 ERA with 100 strikeouts over 85 1/3 innings.

MLB.com had Dickey ranked as the No. 179 prospect entering the Draft.

"He's a strong right-handed pitcher," said scout Jimmy Gonzales, who covers the South Texas area. "Great character kid, solid breaking ball. I feel like he's going to be a starter. And [he] really expressed a lot of interest in wanting to play for us."

Duke righty Van Orden drafted in Round 5 by Nats

Drew Van Orden was taken No. 154 overall on Friday.

With the No. 154 overall pick in the fifth round of the First-Year Player Draft on Friday, the Nationals selected Drew Van Orden, a right-hander out of Duke.

The 6-foot-4, 200-pound senior had impressive numbers this past season for the Blue Devils, sporting a 3.19 ERA with 91 strikeouts in 87 1/3 innings over 14 starts. He led the team in innings, strikeouts and walks.

The Draft concludes on Saturday with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at 1 p.m. ET.

Van Orden moved into the Friday-night starter role before Duke's ACC slate, and he finished the season ranked 13th in the conference in opponents' batting average at .219. He led the Blue Devils to a 6-0 ACC Tournament victory over Georgia Tech, the eventual champions, with eight strikeouts in his first career shutout, and he was named to the All-Tournament team for his performance.

"The pitching we got are all guys with good bodies, good deliveries," vice president of scouting operations Kris Kline said.

Van Orden made 12 starts as a junior in 2013, going 3-5 with a 5.94 ERA. He struggled mightily against ACC competition, posting a 7.44 ERA in 11 conference appearances, eight of them starts. However, he showed drastic improvement in his senior season in 2014, allowing 24 earned runs over 64 innings in 10 ACC starts, which accounted for a 3.38 in-conference ERA.

Williams is third straight righty Nats draft

Austen Williams was the ace of Texas State's pitching staff this season.

With the No. 184 overall pick in the sixth round of the First-Year Player Draft on Friday, the Nationals selected Austen Williams out of Texas State, the team's third consecutive right-handed pitcher in as many rounds.

The Draft concludes on Saturday with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at 1 p.m. ET.

The 6-foot-3, 220-pound Williams started the season throwing a fastball that ranged between 91-94 mph, but it tapered off to 87-90 mph, according to Jim Callis of MLB.com. Williams also throws a hard slider.

The 21-year-old was the ace of Texas State's pitching staff this season and led the Bobcats with eight wins and 98 strikeouts. He compiled a .239 opponents' batting average, which ranked fifth in the Sun Belt Conference, and a 3.65 ERA.

On April 5, Williams pitched a shutout to lead Texas State past South Alabama, 2-0. He only allowed six baserunners on the game and struck out seven batters.

Nats' first outfield pick a defensive gem

The Nats believe Dale Carey could be an everyday outfielder.

In his first three seasons at the University of Miami, center fielder Dale Carey, whom the Nationals selected with the No. 214 overall pick in the seventh round of the First-Year Player Draft on Friday, made a name for himself with breathtaking diving catches. Yet his hitting ability lagged far behind his defensive prowess, as he posted averages of .271, .271 and .192 in 2011, '12 and '13, respectively.

In each of those three seasons, Carey didn't hit more than two home runs or compile more than 24 RBIs.

But in his senior season with the Hurricanes, Carey added offensive production to his bag of tools, which made him a viable pick for Washington on Day 2 of the Draft, which concludes on Saturday with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at 1 p.m. ET.

"He struggled throughout the course of his college career," vice president of scouting operations Kris Kline said. "But as of this year, the thing we noticed was how he simplified his approach and his setup. He's calmed things down and slowed the game down offensively."

The 6-foot-2, 191-pound Carey batted .305 with seven home runs, 29 RBIs, 16 stolen bases and a .405 on-base percentage in 2014 at Miami. He also ranked second in the ACC in runs with 53 and fourth in hits with 75.

"He's always been a really good defender," Kline said. "He throws well. He runs well. As far as the bat goes, it was encouraging to see him progress, to do what we feel like he's capable of doing. And we're actually really excited about having him as part of our system. He's got power, so you're looking at a guy that I think, at the low, is an extra player at the big league level, but potentially could be an everyday outfielder."

Nats add lefty bat in the eighth round

Jeff Gardner was the American Athletic Conference Player of the Year.

The Nationals added their second outfielder of the First-Year Player Draft on Friday with the No. 244 overall pick of the eighth round: left fielder Jeff Gardner out of the University of Louisville.

The Draft concludes on Saturday with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at 1 p.m. ET.

Gardner was the American Athletic Conference Player of the Year in 2014, and he hit .326 with nine home runs, 67 RBIs -- which leads the league -- and a .551 slugging percentage so far this season.

"We got some left-handed power bats that we like," vice president of scouting operations Kris Kline said.

Gardner led the Cardinals to a No. 1 seed in the Louisville, Ky., regional of the NCAA Tournament.

Byler parlays position switch into Nats' ninth pick

Draft Report: Austin Byler, College First Baseman

After selecting three pitchers in the early stages of Day 2 of the First-Year Player Draft on Friday, the Nationals turned their focus to college position players.

With the No. 274 overall pick in the ninth round, Washington drafted first baseman Austin Byler out of Nevada. The 6-foot-3, 225-pound junior spent his first two seasons at Nevada as a third baseman, but he made the transition to first for the 2014 season and finished with a .998 fielding percentage.

The Draft concludes on Saturday with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at 1 p.m. ET.

Byler complemented his stout fielding with stellar hitting. He batted .326 with 14 home runs and 47 RBIs in 57 games this season. He also compiled a .420 on-base percentage and a .624 slugging percentage, while swiping seven bases.

Nats finish Day 2 with lefty power bat selection

With their final pick on Day 2 of the First-Year Player Draft, the Nationals drafted another left-handed power bat in Matt Page out of Oklahoma Baptist.

The Draft concludes on Saturday with exclusive coverage of Rounds 11-40 beginning on MLB.com at 1 p.m. ET.

Page was named the 2013 NAIA Player of Year after hitting 15 homers and driving in 85 runs in 63 games. The 6-foot-3, 210-pound right fielder followed that award-winning year with another impressive campaign this season, hitting 11 long balls while compiling 84 RBIs in 64 games.

In a game against Dallas Christian College on Jan. 31, Page went 4-for-6 with three doubles, a triple and eight RBIs. He finished the 2014 season with a .387 batting average and a .700 slugging percentage. Page also stole 31 bases and ranked second in NAIA with 78 runs.