PHOENIX -- The D-backs joined the rest of Major League Baseball on Tuesday in honoring the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The organization marked the 11th anniversary of the tragedy with a video tribute and a moment of silence for those who lost their lives on that day and the men and women of the armed forces who have died since in the fight against terrorism.

There was a presentation and recognition of Honor and Remember, an organization dedicated to recognizing soldiers who have lost their lives defending the United States.

The first pitch was thrown out by Rich Bauer from the United Phoenix Firefighters Association, while Brigetta Barrett, a junior at the University of Arizona who won a silver medal in the high jump in the London Olympics, sang the national anthem.

Young hopes to return to action soon

PHOENIX -- Chris Young ran prior to batting practice Tuesday, and the D-backs outfielder is optimistic that he could return to action sooner rather than later.

Young has been unable to start since he injured his right quadriceps muscle on Sept. 3 in San Francisco. A Tuesday MRI exam revealed a strain.

"Just a mild strain," Young said. "It's just based on when I feel like I can go 100 percent. The MRI didn't change anything as far as how I'm treating it. I want to get back as soon as possible. But being a center fielder, you can't come back at 70 percent. As a center fielder you have to be able to cover a lot of ground."

To take Young's place in the lineup, the D-backs called up Adam Eaton, who has started all six games Young has missed. That has cut into the playing time for Gerardo Parra, but D-backs manager Kirk Gibson said the team wants to see what Eaton can do.

"We talked to Gerardo about that," Gibson said. "He was pretty bummed out about it initially, but we still think very highly of him. It doesn't really mean we think any less about him."

Gibson takes responsibility for D-backs' letdown

PHOENIX -- Manager Kirk Gibson is not ready to conduct a postmortem on the D-backs season while they are still mathematically alive to make the playoffs.

The D-backs manager, though, realizes that with 20 games left after Tuesday and a large deficit in both the National League West and Wild Card races, that the odds are longer than long.

And when it comes to who's responsible for the predicament, Gibson is more than willing to be held accountable.

"I fully acknowledge I'm disappointed in the position that we're in," Gibson said. "Trust me, I spent a whole off-day analyzing and I spend virtually any time that I'm not sleeping analyzing how to get out of the situation we're in. One of the ways is to continue to push on and then how to avoid it in the future. It's not where we want to be. I'm not going to sugarcoat that at all. I'm disappointed in myself when it comes to that. I assume all accountability."

The D-backs entered Tuesday night's game trailing the first-place Giants by 10 games, and their deficit in the Wild Card race was six games. Six games is not as far back as the Cardinals were last year, but the difference is they have five teams to pass.

A longer than long shot for sure, but Gibson refuses to give in until his team is officially eliminated.

"Maybe it's never been done before, but there's great stories in sports all around the continent," Gibson said. "That's just the way I think. I know you guys think I'm crazy, but I've been through several things throughout my career in different capacities in competing and I've lived some very, very good dreams so that's where I stand at."